Skip to content

Main Navigation

ALYSSA CASTOR


Alyssa Castor

Undergraduate, Environmental and Sustainability Studies
alyssa.castor07@gmail.com 


Alyssa Castor is a third-year undergraduate student studying Environmental and Sustainability Studies with an emphasis in Land Management, Conservation, and Place. She is also an ambassador for the Hinkley Institute of Politics. Her research interests are focused on environmental justice, resource management, environmental policy and GIS. She works as an undergraduate research assistant for the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. Alyssa's current research is focused on the environmental and health impacts of Hurricane Harvey after accidental releases by petrochemical facilities. After completing her undergraduate education, Alyssa looks forward to attending graduate school.

 

colby child


Colby Child

Undergraduate, Geography & Philosophy


Colby Child is a third-year undergraduate student double majoring in Geography and Philosophy.  His emphasis in Geography is Population, Development, and Sustainability.  He works as an undergraduate research assistant at the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah.  He has received funding for fall of 2020 through the "Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP)."  Colby is a member of the Solutions Scholars in the 2019-2021 cohort, wherein students perform research and demonstrate commitment to addressing key global issues.  He is also a writer for Wasatch Magazine, the University of Utah's outdoor magazine.  His current research examines the intersectional effects of racial/ethnic and older age statuses on both chronic and acute measures of exposure to PM2.5 air pollution in US metropolitan areas along the US-Mexico border.

AARON FLORES


Aaron Flores

Ph.D. Student, Geography
aaron.b.flores@utah.edu 


Aaron Flores is a Doctoral student in the Department of Geography and a Graduate Assistant for the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. He is also an active member of the American Association of Geographers. His research has focused on social vulnerability to environmental hazards and health disparities. He has conducted research on Hurricane Harvey and its impact on residents in the greater Houston, Texas area and on extreme heat vulnerability in Lubbock, Texas. Aaron obtained a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Science in the Department of Geography at Texas Tech University. He has interned for the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center, the Texas Tech University Climate Science Center, and was a UC Santa Cruz Climate Engagement Program Fellow in 2017. He has also completed training in Community Resilience and Community Planning for Disaster Recovery from the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center.

ANGEL GRIEGO


Angel Griego

Undergraduate, Psychology & Sociology
u1103010@utah.edu 


Angel Griego is a second-year undergraduate student double majoring in Psychology and Sociology and a Research Assistant for the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. She is a member of the Solution Scholars program in the 2019-2021 cohort, wherein students perform research and demonstrate commitment to addressing key global issues. She is also a National Society of Leadership and Success member. Her current research is focused on racial inequality in receiving Hurricane Harvey post-disaster recovery aid and the impact of racial differences in the source of recovery aid on speed of recovery. Her research interests include issues of racial inequity, biases in decision making, and group dynamics. She aims to obtain an advanced degree in Social Psychology and continue working in the research field.

 

ZIXUAN HUANG


Zixuan Huang

M.S. Student, Geography
zixuan.huang@utah.edu 


Zixuan Huang is a Master’s student in the Department of Geography and a Graduate Assistant for the DIGIT Lab at the University of Utah. He is also an active member of the American Association of Geographers. As a geographer and urban planner, he is very interested in using autonomous vehicles to evacuate carless populations during natural hazards. His thesis research is focused on modeling autonomous shuttle station siting and shuttle evacuation routes in Lee County, Florida. Zixuan received his Bachelor of Science (2017) in Geography from Penn State University. He has interned for the Friendly Cities Lab at Penn State. During this internship, he helped the research team to analyze global residential ornamentation using Airbnb images. Zixuan loves traveling when he has free time. He also enjoys tennis, aviation, photography, and scuba diving.

 

CASEY MULLEN


Aaron Flores

Ph.D. Student, Sociology
casey.mullen@utah.edu 


Casey Mullen is a Doctoral student in the Department of Sociology. Her research interests include environmental justice, climate justice, social vulnerability to hazards/disasters, environmental health disparities, and community based participatory research. Her future research will involve a mixed methods approach in order to examine the impact of air pollution on understandings and behaviors associated with the use of personal air quality monitors. She has also conducted qualitative research on climate change understandings and actions in the Southeast Florida region. Casey obtained her Bachelor of Arts (2013) at East Carolina University and her Master of Arts (2018) at Florida Atlantic University while majoring in Sociology for both degrees. She has completed training in Community Resilience for the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center, Al Gore’s Climate Reality Leadership Corps, as well as a Climate Resilience Leadership Training in Southeast Florida.

 

SHAWNA NADYBAL


Shawna Nadybal

M.S. Student, Geography
u1213966@utah.edu 


Shawna Nadybal is a Masters student in the Department of Geography and an affiliate of the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. As a Brian L. and Michelle J. Haslam Fellow, she is mainly interested in the unique interactions between social positioning and vulnerability to hazards or health disparities in the contiguous United States. Shawna received her Bachelor of Arts (2017, Summa Cum Laude) in Liberal Studies from California State University, Northridge, where she also completed a minor in American Indian Studies. It was here where Shawna was identified as a Matador Rising Scholar, and also introduced to the discipline of environmental justice that has since served as her research framework. When Shawna is not working alongside her research team, she enjoys soccer, skating, surfing, and hiking with her dog River.

 

JOEL PALMER


joel palmer

Ph.D. Student, Geography
Joel.Palmer@utah.edu  


Joel Palmer is a Doctoral student in the Department of Geography with research interests focused on community hazard and disaster resilience. Specific areas of interest include a comparison of pre-disaster and post-disaster grants to assess whether pre-disaster spending is effectively increasing national resilience and comparing flood mitigation measures to other natural hazards (e.g., wildfire, earthquake) to identify which of those techniques might be applicable to non-flood events. Additionally, Joel is a full-time employee of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) where he has worked for the past ten years. His experience with FEMA includes developing disaster exercises, conducting threat and hazard analysis, and supporting disaster response efforts across the country. He is now the lead for the FEMA Integration Team (FIT) for the state of Utah working to support state efforts to increase preparedness for major disasters including to a catastrophic earthquake along the Wasatch Fault.

ROGER RENTERIA


Roger Renteria

Ph.D. Student, Sociology
roger.renteria@soc.utah.edu


Roger is a Doctoral student in the Department of Sociology and a fellow of the Global Change and Sustainability Center at the University of Utah. Originally from El Paso, Texas, Roger attended the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) where his work as a sociology graduate student centered on social inequalities experienced by people living with the loss of a limb in México. He has experience working with the NIH-funded BUILDing SCHOLARS program at UTEP as a research mentor for undergrad students and he headed the peer-mentoring program for first- and second-year cohorts. His current research and teaching interests revolve around social inequalities, health disparities, environmental justice, and environmental sociology.



AHMAD MOJTOBA RIYADH


Ahmad Mojtoba Riyadh

M.S. Student, Geography
riyadh.mojtoba@utah.edu


Ahmad Mojtoba Riyadh is a Master’s student in the Department of Geography and a Graduate Assistant for the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. He graduated from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET). His undergraduate thesis focused on area delimitation and comparison of their characteristics in Dhaka, Bangladesh. This work was published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Regional Science. He has previously conducted research using kernel density analysis and a space index to develop a methodology for delimitating the city core area. His current research interests include GIScience, disaster risk, resilience and vulnerability analysis, environmental science, and urban planning.

RICARDO RUBIO


Ricardo Rubio

Ph.D. Student, Sociology
rrubio737@gmail.com


Ricardo Rubio is a Doctoral student in the Department of Sociology and a Research Assistant under Dr. Sara Grineski at the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. He has conducted research on the effects of generational status on food insecurity, heat resilience with Spanish-speaking populations in San Elizario, Texas, and hazardous air pollutant exposure based on ancestry at the national level. Ricardo obtained his Bachelor of Arts (2018) in Psychology from the University of Texas at El Paso. He was also a part of the 2017 National Science Foundation funded Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity: Southwest Consortium of Health-Oriented Education Leaders and Research Scholars (BUILDing SCHOLARS) 2017 Summer Research Program. He is an author on two articles, one focused on transitions in and out of food insecurity amongst children, and the other focused on how generational status impacts food insecurity levels for children. 

YASI SHAKER


Yasi

Ph.D Student, Department of Sociology
yasi.shaker@utah.edu 


Yasi Shaker is a Doctoral student in the Department of Sociology and a team member of the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. Her research and teaching interests include environmental justice, environmental sociology, social impacts of climate change, social vulnerability to hazards/disasters, food Security/food Justice and the state of diversity in the environmental sector. Yasi received her B.A. in Psychology with a minor in Anthropology and Sociology and a concentration in Environmental Studies from Kalamazoo College.

SHAYLYNN TREGO


Shaylynn

Undergraduate, Department of Geography
u01018712@utah.edu


Shaylynn Trego is a second-year undergraduate student majoring in Geography with an emphasis in Population, Sustainability, and Development, and a certificate in GIS. She is a Research Assistant for the Center for Natural and Technological Hazards at the University of Utah. Her current research is focused on the socio-economic vulnerabilities of air pollution and extreme heat amongst children. Her other research interests include climate change vulnerability, urban development, and GIS. After the completion of her undergraduate degree, Shaylynn plans on obtaining a graduate degree in Geography.

 

Last Updated: 9/8/20